The Chinese Online Market

    Reference
Population 1,354,000,000 IMF-World Economic Outlook Database 2012
Internet population 538,000,000 CNNIC 2012
Internet use 39.9%
Scale of online advertising market 8.11 billion USD  China Internet Watch 2011
  • 90% of Chinese Internet users’ monthly income is under 5,000 RMB (790 USD) (CNNIC).
  • 4% of Internet users access the Internet via PC, while 69.3% prefer mobile (CNNIC).
  • Approximately 700 million Chinese (52% of the population) will be added to the online community by 2016 ( eMarketer).
  • In China, approximately 10 million people become part of the online community each month (We Are Social).
  • 5% of Internet users in China live in metropolitan areas (CNNIC).
  • 2% of Internet users in China access it at Internet cafes (CNNIC).
  • Chinese Internet users spend an average of 18.7 hours online per week (CNNIC).
  • 415,000,000 Chinese (77% of the Internet community) chat online (CNNIC).
  • 465,000,000 Chinese (86% of the Internet community) watch videos online ( China Internet Watch).
  • 63% of Internet users play online games (CNNIC).
  • Chinese aged 18-27 make up the largest group of Internet users. They spend an average of 5 hours online daily ( We Are Social).
  • In China, approximately 10,000 searches are performed on search engines every second (We Are Social).
  • The search engine marketing industry grew 3 billion USD from 2010 to 2011 (iResearch).
  • 61% of online shoppers ask for recommendations from friends or family before they make a purchase.
  • In 2011, the value of the Chinese e-commerce market was 1.1 trillion USD (iResearch).
  • The results of a survey of the most trustworthy sites in China were (1st) Amazon.cn, (2nd) 360 buy, and (3rd) Tmall (DCCI).
  • 319,000,000 Chinese (59% of Internet users) have their own blog (CNNIC).
  • Sina Weibo, the largest Chinese social networking service (SNS,) has 300,000,000 users, and 100,000,000 articles are posted online each day (CNNIC).
  • Due to Chinese government regulations, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube are inaccessible in China.

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